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Speaker interview: Jim Dixon

Why did you apply to become a TEDxDerby speaker? or (if you were nominated) what qualities do you think you were nominated for?

I was probably nominated because I have a high profile in Derbyshire. I use social media a lot and write columns in magazines and newspapers. I believe strongly top executives should be great communicators.

Tell us a bit about your talk…

I have a scientific background in ecology. This discipline has developed some profound concepts which help explain our place in nature. I think ecology is a much underrated science. I will be drawing on some ecological concepts and drawing on my own working experience to see where ideas are the richest - on the edge. At the point where different habitats join species richness is greatest. For many of the biggest challenges facing our society we can learn a lot by working across traditional institutional barriers - public, private and voluntary. If we ignore these barriers, we can generate rich innovation and this is the best way to solve problems.

What do you hope to take away from your time on the TEDxDerby stage?

Some more contacts, some great tips from other brilliant speakers and some ideas I can use in my work.

What are you hoping the TEDxDerby audience takes away from your talk?

A better appreciation of what the science of ecology can offer and some ideas about how to address difficult issues.

If you could offer one piece of advice to let your ideas take flight, what would it be?

Find out more about places, people and institutions you’re not used to working with. See whether these environments might help you solve your problems and ignore the barriers!

Speaker interview: Simon Hancox

Tell us an interesting fact about you?

I almost died as a child. I had jaundice when I was born and had to have a full blood transfusion. I was in an incubator for quite some time.

Why did you apply to become a TEDxDerby speaker? or (if you were nominated) what qualities do you think you were nominated for?

I often refer to TED in my day job so to be nominated was quite something. To say yes and stand up and deliver with the TEDx logo in the background means a lot to me. I’m a very open and very honest chap. I think that’s come across in my writing over the last 14 months.

Tell us a bit about your talk…

My talk is about the power of connecting with others - not just close friends, but also distant friends and new friends. My talk will focus on idea of embracing vulnerability and challenging yourself. The example I’ll be giving is about my own experiences over the last 15 months of becoming a widower.

What do you hope to take away from your time on the TEDxDerby stage?

I’m hoping to enjoy the experience on the day and I’m hoping that sharing my story in this way can help others who are perhaps going through a similar journey.

What are you hoping the TEDxDerby audience takes away from your talk?

I hope the TEDxDerby audience appreciates the difficulties I’ve faced this last year and that other widowers and widows will face a similar journey. I hope the audience will be able to reflect on my words and experiences and offer some support to those going through something similar in their own networks.

If you could offer one piece of advice to let your ideas take flight, what would it be?

Go with your instincts. You know yourself better than anyone, you know how to make an informed judgement about something. If it feels right, really feels right, then go for it - those closest to you will understand. To quote Dr Seuss: “Those that mind won’t matter, and those that matter won't mind”.

Speaker interview: Pete Mosley

Tell us an interesting fact about you?

I was the ‘over 30’s’ winner in the World Unicycle Championships in New York, 1986.

Why did you apply to become a TEDxDerby speaker? or (if you were nominated) what qualities do you think you were nominated for?

It happened by a remarkable bit of serendipity – I asked someone for help, explained my goals, mentioned that I’d always wanted to do a TED talk and the chain of events kicked in from there. I was chuffed to be selected (even more so now I’ve got to see who some of the other speakers are). I’m known for helping people take significant steps forward by identifying and conquering the self-limiting beliefs that get in their way and I do this by sticking to simple workable solutions that anyone can employ.

Tell us a bit about your talk…

Funnily enough it’s about not being afraid to ask for help, being clear about your goals and using simple methods (to be revealed) to work collaboratively to achieve remarkable things.

What do you hope to take away from your time on the TEDxDerby stage?

New friends - and a keener understanding of how others react to and overcome challenges. I know I will learn an enormous amount from the process but more importantly from the other people taking part – the speakers and audience.

What are you hoping the TEDxDerby audience takes away from your talk?

In a world of increasing complexity and demand, I’d like to feel that my talk will remind people that there are still simple and effective ways to make remarkable things happen. I’m fairly certain that what I say will translate into action for a fair number of people in the audience.

If you could offer one piece of advice to let your ideas take flight, what would it be?

Be clear about what holds you back and what motivates you to move forward. Embrace both. Be forgiving of your critics. Understand that you are not alone. Know that asking for help is not an admission of failure but rather a statement of integrity, strength and preparedness to move forward.

Speaker interview: Nigel Vardy

Tell us an interesting fact about you?

I lost my sense of smell when my nose fell off.

Why did you apply to become a TEDxDerby speaker? or (if you were nominated) what qualities do you think you were nominated for?

Christine invited me to speak. I'm already a speaker and mountaineer and I fancied a challenge covering an unusual subject, which impacts on people's experiences and perceptions as they travel.

Tell us a bit about your talk…

I want to question whether technology has crept too far into the world of adventure. Has the ability to call/tweet/post blogs etc taken the edge off what should be a time of reflection and discovery?

What do you hope to take away from your time on the TEDxDerby stage?

Thoughts upon opening this debate and the adventure of seeing where it goes.

What are you hoping the TEDxDerby audience takes away from your talk?

The idea to change their habits and perhaps live a little of their lives offline.

If you could offer one piece of advice to let your ideas take flight, what would it be?

Sometimes in your life you need to let go…

TEDxDerby tickets - 7 days to go!

First of all… a big happy new year to everyone from the team at TEDxDerby. We hope you have entered 2014 rested and raring to go!

We most certainly have!

To hit the ground running, we’re excited to announce that TEDxDerby tickets officially go on sale on Friday 10th January. That’s right, a mere SEVEN days away!

Over the next few weeks we'll have lots of announcements for you, including our speaker line-up, so we recommend getting your tickets early to avoid missing out.

Sign up to our mailing list to be the first in line to grab yours and keep an eye on our Twitter and TEDxDerby.com for news and updates.

TEDxDerby at the BBC

Our very own Christine was invited to join Colin Bloomfield on BBC Radio Derby to chat through the ins and outs of TEDxDerby.

Colin was keen to find out why we’re bringing TEDx to Derby and how the talks aren’t the same as your usual ‘PowerPoint presentation’.

Christine said: “TED is a bit more slick, it’s not ten thousand words on a slide behind you... the talks are short because if you’ve got an idea worth spreading you can tell it quickly and confidently.

“You don’t have to be a famous person to do a TED talk. You could have opened your own shop or overcome a challenge for example. It doesn’t matter your age, employment status or ambitions, come along TEDxDerby and you will find a story that resonates with your own life.”

To find out where the chicken baguette came into all this, hear the full interview here: